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Difference between revisions of "Chip On Board"

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A bare chip that is mounted directly onto the printed circuit board (PCB). After the wires are attached, a glob of epoxy or plastic is used to cover the chip and its connections. The tape automated bonding (TAB) process is used to place the chip on the board. The bare chip is adhered and wire bonded to the board, and an epoxy is poured over it to insulate and protect it.
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A bare chip (die) that is mounted directly onto the printed circuit board (PCB). After the wires are attached, a glob of epoxy or plastic is used to cover the chip and its connections. The tape automated bonding (TAB) process is used to place the chip on the board. The bare chip is adhered and wire bonded to the board, and an epoxy is poured over it to insulate and protect it.
 
[[Category:Dictionary]]
 
[[Category:Dictionary]]
 
[[Category:Hardware]]
 
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=References=
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[http://dieproducts.org/index.html The Die Products Consortium] maintains [http://www.dieproducts.org/tutorials/index.php tutorials] on many facets of die technology.  In particular, they have a multi-page tutorial that explains the details of [http://www.dieproducts.org/tutorials/assembly/cob/index.php Chip on Board] technology.
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<references/>

Latest revision as of 20:12, 18 January 2013

A bare chip (die) that is mounted directly onto the printed circuit board (PCB). After the wires are attached, a glob of epoxy or plastic is used to cover the chip and its connections. The tape automated bonding (TAB) process is used to place the chip on the board. The bare chip is adhered and wire bonded to the board, and an epoxy is poured over it to insulate and protect it.


References

The Die Products Consortium maintains tutorials on many facets of die technology. In particular, they have a multi-page tutorial that explains the details of Chip on Board technology.