Difference between revisions of "EBC Exercise 01 Start Here"

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m (Starting fresh for the Fall 2012 class)
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[[Category:ECE497]]
 
[[Category:ECE497]]
 
{{YoderHead}}
 
{{YoderHead}}
== Setting up your hardware and software ==
+
There are four major things that need to be done to have the BeagleBoard ready to run for class:
 +
# Get your Beagle Hardware together
 +
# Write the SD card for you Beagle
 +
# Set up a host computer, running Linux for code development
 +
# Clone the course git repository on both the Beagle and the host
  
There are three major things that need to be done to have the BeagleBoard ready to run for class. Hardware, software on the Beagle and software on a host computer.  Here are the details.
+
If you have a BeagleBone and want to start playing, go to [[EBC Exercise 02 Out-of-the-Box, Bone]]. The Bone comes with all the hardware you need and an SD card that's ready to run.
 +
 
 +
After you've had a chance to explore the Bone, or you are running a Beagle xM, check [[#The Hardware | The Hardware]] below. Once you have all your hardware together you need to get an up to date image for you SD cards. Go to [[EBC Exercise 03 Installing a Beagle OS]] to learn how to flash your SD card with a fresh OS. With a fresh OS installed, you are now ready for [[EBC Exercise 04 Out-of-the-Box, xM]] on the xM.  It'a little different than the bone.
 +
 
 +
Once you have an up to date OS running on your Beagle, go to [[EBC Exercise 05 Getting Exercise Support Materials]] to learn how to clone the class git repository. Once cloned it's a single command to get the latest materials on your Beagle (or host computer for that matter).
 +
 
 +
The above will get you ready for about the first 4 weeks of class. Around week 5 we'll start looking at the kernel and will need to cross compile. Once we start moving into Kernel development we will need a host computer. Since we are doing Linux development, it's generally agree the host should be running LinuxI suggest you run [http://www.ubuntu.com Ubuntu 12.04 (LTS)]. The Rose Linux Users Group [http://lug.rose-hulman.edu/wiki/Main_Page LUG] has instructions on where to get a local copy so you don't have to download some 700M.
 +
 
 +
There are three options as to how to run Linux.
 +
# Native install ([http://www.ubuntu.com/download])
 +
# Install in a virtual machine. I've been running [[EBC Exercise 06 Notes on VirtualBox | Virtual Box]] recently and it seems to work find.  You can also try [[EBC Exercise 07 Notes on Installing Ubuntu in VMware Player | VMware Player]].
 +
# Run in the cloud
 +
 
 +
The Ubuntu site gives good instructions for a native install. I've had good success with running both VMware and Virtual Box, though my installation instructions are a bit dated.  (Feel free to update them if they need it.)
 +
 
 +
I've been testing out the "Cloud" approach and it looks like it will work too.  If you want to try the cloud, let me known and I'll ask CSSE to set up a machine for you.
 +
 
 +
Once you have Linux running somewhere, you need to install the kernel development tools.  Go to [[EBC Exercise 08 Installing Development Tools]] to see all the step you need. Once set up, go back to [[EBC Exercise 05 Getting Exercise Support Materials]] to clone the class repository on your host.
 +
 
 +
Now that you have all these pieces in place you are ready to work with a very power embedded processor.
  
 
=== The Hardware ===
 
=== The Hardware ===
  
I have a Beagle Board xM for everyone to use for the quarter.  I'm assuming you have some hardware already. Here's the hardware you will need and where you get it.
+
Here's the hardware you will need and where you get it.
  
 
==== From the Instrument Room ====
 
==== From the Instrument Room ====
You can pick this up any time, even Monday-Wednesday of break.
+
 
 
* BeagleBoard xM
 
* BeagleBoard xM
 
* 5V power supply
 
* 5V power supply
Line 19: Line 42:
 
* USB keyboard and mouse
 
* USB keyboard and mouse
 
* DVI-D display
 
* DVI-D display
* micro SD card.  4G should be enough.  I suggest you have 2 or 3 cards since it's easy to mess up one and it takes some 10 minutes to reload it.
+
* micro SD card.  4G should be enough.  I suggest you have 3 or 4 cards since it's easy to mess up one and it takes some 10 minutes to reload it.
 
* micro SD card reader/writer
 
* micro SD card reader/writer
* USB to Ethernet adapter.  The Beagle has Ethernet on it, but every time you boot it you get a random MAC address.  If you are running on the Rose network you need a fixed MAC address.
+
* USB to Ethernet adapter.  The Beagle xM has Ethernet on it, but every time you boot it you get a random MAC address.  If you are running on the Rose network you need a fixed MAC address.
 
+
=== Software on the Beagle ===
+
 
+
We're using mostly open source software.  Go to [[EBC_Exercise_00_Installing_Angstrom_on_SD]] to see see how to get everything installed on the SD card for the Beagle. Once installed, you will be able to do the first 10 or so labs completely on the Beagle.  Yup, edit, compile (or make) and run, all on the Beagle.
+
 
+
=== Software on a host computer ===
+
 
+
Once we start moving into Kernel development we will need a host computer. Since we are doing Linux development, it's generally agree the host should be running Linux.  I suggest you run [http://www.ubuntu.com Ubuntu 10.04 (LTS)]. The Rose Linux Users Group [http://lug.rose-hulman.edu/wiki/Main_Page LUG] has instructions on where to get a local copy so you don't have to download some 700M.
+
 
+
There are three options as to how to run Linux.
+
# Native install ([http://www.ubuntu.com/download])
+
# Install in a virtual machine ([[ECE497 Lab00 Installing Ubuntu in VMware Player]], though you could also use [[ECE497 VirtualBox Notes | Virtual Box]] too.)
+
# Run in the cloud
+
 
+
The Ubuntu site give good instructions for a native install. I've had good success with running both VMware and Virtual Box, though my installation instructions are a bit dated.  (Feel free to update them if they need it.)
+
 
+
I've been testing out the "Cloud" approach and it looks like it will work too.  If you want to try the cloud, let me known and I'll ask CSSE to set up a machine for you.
+
  
 
{{YoderHead}}
 
{{YoderHead}}

Revision as of 16:18, 16 July 2012

thumb‎ Embedded Linux Class by Mark A. Yoder


There are four major things that need to be done to have the BeagleBoard ready to run for class:

  1. Get your Beagle Hardware together
  2. Write the SD card for you Beagle
  3. Set up a host computer, running Linux for code development
  4. Clone the course git repository on both the Beagle and the host

If you have a BeagleBone and want to start playing, go to EBC Exercise 02 Out-of-the-Box, Bone. The Bone comes with all the hardware you need and an SD card that's ready to run.

After you've had a chance to explore the Bone, or you are running a Beagle xM, check The Hardware below. Once you have all your hardware together you need to get an up to date image for you SD cards. Go to EBC Exercise 03 Installing a Beagle OS to learn how to flash your SD card with a fresh OS. With a fresh OS installed, you are now ready for EBC Exercise 04 Out-of-the-Box, xM on the xM. It'a little different than the bone.

Once you have an up to date OS running on your Beagle, go to EBC Exercise 05 Getting Exercise Support Materials to learn how to clone the class git repository. Once cloned it's a single command to get the latest materials on your Beagle (or host computer for that matter).

The above will get you ready for about the first 4 weeks of class. Around week 5 we'll start looking at the kernel and will need to cross compile. Once we start moving into Kernel development we will need a host computer. Since we are doing Linux development, it's generally agree the host should be running Linux. I suggest you run Ubuntu 12.04 (LTS). The Rose Linux Users Group LUG has instructions on where to get a local copy so you don't have to download some 700M.

There are three options as to how to run Linux.

  1. Native install ([1])
  2. Install in a virtual machine. I've been running Virtual Box recently and it seems to work find. You can also try VMware Player.
  3. Run in the cloud

The Ubuntu site gives good instructions for a native install. I've had good success with running both VMware and Virtual Box, though my installation instructions are a bit dated. (Feel free to update them if they need it.)

I've been testing out the "Cloud" approach and it looks like it will work too. If you want to try the cloud, let me known and I'll ask CSSE to set up a machine for you.

Once you have Linux running somewhere, you need to install the kernel development tools. Go to EBC Exercise 08 Installing Development Tools to see all the step you need. Once set up, go back to EBC Exercise 05 Getting Exercise Support Materials to clone the class repository on your host.

Now that you have all these pieces in place you are ready to work with a very power embedded processor.

The Hardware

Here's the hardware you will need and where you get it.

From the Instrument Room

  • BeagleBoard xM
  • 5V power supply
  • HDMI to DVI cable
  • serial to USB cable

From your own resources

  • USB keyboard and mouse
  • DVI-D display
  • micro SD card. 4G should be enough. I suggest you have 3 or 4 cards since it's easy to mess up one and it takes some 10 minutes to reload it.
  • micro SD card reader/writer
  • USB to Ethernet adapter. The Beagle xM has Ethernet on it, but every time you boot it you get a random MAC address. If you are running on the Rose network you need a fixed MAC address.

thumb‎ Embedded Linux Class by Mark A. Yoder