Difference between revisions of "LeapFrog Pollux Platform: Mount NFS Directory"

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[[LeapFrog_Pollux_Platform:_Networking| Networking Setup]]
 
[[LeapFrog_Pollux_Platform:_Networking| Networking Setup]]
  
[https://help.ubuntu.com/8.04/serverguide/C/network-file-system.html| NFS Host Setup]
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For Didj [[Didj_Enable_Networking| Enable Networking]] using the lf1000_ff_eth_defconfig file or manually adding NFS support.
  
  
== Configure Device ==
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== Software Needed ==
 +
Linux host PC
  
'' On Device ''
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nfs-kernel-server
You'll need to edit /usr/bin/mountnfs, change:
+
  
 +
nfs-common
  
  mount -o nolock `get-ip host`:/home/lfu/nfsroot/LF /LF
 
  
 +
== Configure Server and Client ==
 +
'' On Host ''
 +
 +
Make sure your programs are installed.
 +
sudo apt-get nfs-kernel-server nfs-common
 +
 +
 +
Configure the /etc/exports file to point to the folder(s) you would like to make available for NFS mounting. Be sure to specify the IP of your device, otherwise anyone can mount it.
 +
/home    10.0.0.2(rw,sync,no_root_squash)
 +
 +
 +
'' On Device ''
 +
 +
You'll need to edit /usr/bin/mountnfs, change:
 +
  mount -o nolock `get-ip host`:/home/lfu/nfsroot/LF /LF
 
to:
 
to:
 
   mount -o nolock 10.0.0.1:/home/ /mnt
 
   mount -o nolock 10.0.0.1:/home/ /mnt
  
once you've done that, run:
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Start the server and client:
  modprobe nfs
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  mountnfs
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  cd /mnt
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  ls
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and you should see the contents of your /home dir
 
  
4. things to note
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'' On Host ''
 +
$ sudo /etc/init.d/nfs-kernel-server start
 +
 
 +
 
 +
''' For Leapster and LeapPad Explorers '''
 +
 
 +
'' On Device ''
 +
# modprobe nfs
 +
# mountnfs
 +
# cd /mnt
 +
# ls
 +
 
  
obviously you can set whatever folder you like on the host as an nfs share and mount it to any folder you like on the explorer or make a new dir, just make sure you edit /etc/exports on the host and /usr/bin/mountnfs accordingly, so for instance if I want to use /home/didj then on the host machine I would edit /etc/exports and either edit the existing one or add the line:
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''' For Network Enabled Didj '''
  
<code>
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mount -o nolock 10.0.0.1:/home /mnt
  /home/didj    *(rw,sync,no_root_squash)
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</code>
+
  
and edit /usr/bin/mountnfs, either add another line or edit the existing one:
 
  
<code>
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At this point should see the contents of your /home dir
  mount -o nolock 10.0.0.1:home/didj /LF/test
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</code>
+
  
you could quite easily at this stage make a /LF/test/bin folder, add that to your path environment variable and run any script/app you have made/compiled for the explorer without having to copy it to the first.
 
  
next up will be mounting a rootfs via NFS :)
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[[Category:Didj]]
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[[Category:Leapster Explorer]]
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[[Category:LeapPad Explorer]]
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[[Category:LeapFrog Pollux Platform]]

Latest revision as of 07:37, 12 July 2011

Summary

This is a tutorial to setup an NFS folder on your host PC for your explorer to boot from. NFS mounting of a directory will enable you to test applications and scripts without having to copy anything to your Leapster or LeapPad Explorer.

Prerequisites

Networking Setup

For Didj Enable Networking using the lf1000_ff_eth_defconfig file or manually adding NFS support.


Software Needed

Linux host PC

nfs-kernel-server

nfs-common


Configure Server and Client

On Host

Make sure your programs are installed.

sudo apt-get nfs-kernel-server nfs-common


Configure the /etc/exports file to point to the folder(s) you would like to make available for NFS mounting. Be sure to specify the IP of your device, otherwise anyone can mount it.

/home    10.0.0.2(rw,sync,no_root_squash)


On Device

You'll need to edit /usr/bin/mountnfs, change:

 mount -o nolock `get-ip host`:/home/lfu/nfsroot/LF /LF

to:

 mount -o nolock 10.0.0.1:/home/ /mnt

Start the server and client:


On Host

$ sudo /etc/init.d/nfs-kernel-server start


For Leapster and LeapPad Explorers

On Device

# modprobe nfs
# mountnfs
# cd /mnt
# ls


For Network Enabled Didj

mount -o nolock 10.0.0.1:/home /mnt


At this point should see the contents of your /home dir