Minnowboard:MaxBoot

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The MinnowBoard MAX comes with a UEFI based boot firmware, and as such follows the basic UEFI specs. In general, if your boot media is setup according to spec (usually containing a efi/boot directory in the first partition which is a vfat partition, marked as a UEFI boot partition) the system should boot without user intervention. However should it not, or you wish to boot a different device please follow these steps:

Step 1

UEFI Shell prompt

Plug everything into the MinnowBoard MAX and attempt a boot. Should it not correctly discover the UEFI boot information (there is at least one known issue surrounding this, that is being worked on), you will get a screen like the one to the right. This is the UEFI shell, and you likely have gotten here by one of a few methods:

  • This may be the first time you've booted the board (this is a known bug)
  • You last booted to the shell
  • You've explicitly set the shell as your default boot
  • You have a storage issue
    • There is not storage on it (things like FS0: will be missing)
    • Your storage isn't configured properly for UEFI
    • You don't have a UEFI boot loader on the device
  • You've explicitly (or accidentally) pressed the correct key to bypass normal boot
  • Something unexpected happened

Step 2

If you aren't sure if you have the right UEFI setup on the disk

UEFI Shell prompt
If you aren't sure if your disk is setup correctly, you should be able to run the following commands (substituting FS0 for the disk displayed by the firmware):
   FS0:
   ls
   # If you don't see a directory listing containing efi in it, you aren't setup correctly
   cd efi
   ls
   # If you don't see a directory listing containing boot in it, you aren't setup correctly
   cd boot
   ls
   # If you don't see a directory listing containing bootx64 and a bootloader (usually grub) in it, you aren't setup correctly

At this point you should have something that looks like the image to the right, if you do type:

   bootx64

Your system should now load the bootloader, typically grub2

If you know you have the right UEFI setup on the disk

If you've gotten this far, and you know you have your disk setup correctly for UEFI, type
   bootx64

Your system should now load the bootloader, typically grub2

UEFI Shell prompt